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訂閱每週新聞

(English) What Children Really Want

週一, 十月 27th, 2014 1:08 下午 | By Stephanie Woo

对不起,此内容只适用于美式英文

(English) What We Did All Summer (of 2014)

週六, 十月 25th, 2014 7:17 下午 | By Stephanie Woo

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, really, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. 

What a summer we’ve had! 

This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!

I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. 

I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. 

The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. 

We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!

Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. 

I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. Not even the park. They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. 

Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. 

<p><!–:en–><img class=”wp-image-4717″ src=”http://montessorionthedouble.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/IMG_2413-660×1024.jpg” alt=”Mackenzie learning Chinese Alphabet” width=”400″ height=”620″ /> Mackenzie learning Chinese Alphabet
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own.</p>
<p><!–:–><!–:zh–>
<p><!–:en–></p>
<p><!–:en–></p>
<p><!–:en–><!–:en–></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:en–></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:en–></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p><!–:en–><!–:en–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:en–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:en–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p><!–:en–><!–:en–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:en–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:en–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p><!–:en–></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:en–><!–:en–></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:en–></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:en–></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:en–><!–:en–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:en–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:en–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:en–><!–:en–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:en–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:en–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p><!–:en–></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:en–><!–:en–></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:en–></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:en–></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:en–><!–:en–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:en–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:en–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:en–><!–:en–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:en–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:en–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–></p>
</p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–>
<p><!–:en–></p>
<p><!–:en–></p>
<p><!–:en–><!–:en–></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:en–></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:en–></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p><!–:en–><!–:en–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:en–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:en–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p><!–:en–><!–:en–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:en–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:zh–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Well, here we are, at the other end of our summer adventure and settled into our new – hopefully permanent – life and home. It feels FANTASTIC to be writing this blog from a home I can finally call my own. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–></p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:–><!–:tw–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p><!–:en–></p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Since I haven’t written for such a long time, I keep thinking that the first blog that comes out must be perfect. I’ve been waiting for perfect, but perfect never happens and, <i>really</i>, it’s the wrong way to look at it. So if this blog post rambles on, forgive me, I’m just gonna give it a go. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>What a summer we’ve had! </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>This was the most upheaval we’ve gone through together as a family, and I wasn’t ready to write about it till we’ve come out the other end. Our friends and family went through all the ups and downs with us. We’re lucky they still love us after what we’ve put them through!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I last left off in June, when Mark and I both got our AMI certifications in Portland and were on our way to Taiwan. We spent two months there. Brooke and Mackenzie attended my mother’s school, Ms. Lam’s Montessori school, while Mark and I worked in the school. He taught soon-to-be first graders, while I observed and taught in both primary and toddler classrooms. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I grew up knowing that our family ran Montessori schools. But it didn’t mean much to me because I didn’t have kids and Montessori was just something Mom did. Now that I’ve been trained in two levels (0-3 and 3-6), I’ve taught at a few schools, observed at many other schools and been a parent with children who have attended a couple Montessori schools, I have a lot more experience evaluating schools. I’ve always assumed my mom’s school was good, but now I must say, her school is among the best I’ve seen. In fact, Mark and I were so impressed, we decided we wanted to open up a Ms. Lam Montessori School in the United States. I love the idea of continuing what my mom started. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>The next part of our summer adventure continued in California. I’ve always had a California dream – sunny, beautiful and the perfect place for a school. Well, dream and reality did not mesh this time. Because everything was new, it turned out to be extremely difficult for us to accomplish all we wanted to do. I was also pregnant when we arrived in California, and when I had a miscarriage – most likely due to the stress of the situation – I knew this was not the place for us. One month after we arrived, we decided our future is where we came from: back home in Brooklyn, NY. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>We landed in New York in mid-September and moved back into our own building in Williamsburg. The second we arrived, we were once again surrounded by beloved friends and family, and I don’t know why we ever thought we belonged anywhere else! We immediately started working on opening our new school. There’s permits, handbooks, websites, classroom design. We’ve got a long to-do list!</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>Meanwhile, we did something radical. We decided to send Brooke and Mackenzie to public school, until our school opens. We did that for several reasons. The school is right next to our house; there were two open spots; it’s just for 2-3 months; we need to save every penny to renovate our school and buy the best materials for our future school. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>
<p></p>
<p>I’ve had moments of doubt, but overall, public school has been an interesting experience. The most surprising thing is this: everyday, when they come home, they don’t want to go anywhere or do anything. <i>Not even the park. </i>They just want to stay home and work. They are totally concentrated and self-sufficient until dinnertime, which is about 3 hours. (insert picture here). I don’t know what they do all day at school, but I think some part of them craves working independently. </p>
<p></p>
<p>
</p>
<p></p>